ARVN soldier armed with an M1, 1966

ARVN soldier armed with an M1, 1966


New Book Titles

I have recently acquired a handful of new books, which I’ve added to the Book list.

I also now own a copy of the Dictionary of the Vietnam War edited by James S. Olson.

UPDATE: The book list now also features a number of reference titles both of books that I have found useful in my own studies about the war along with others. ISBN numbers were included to specify the edition mentioned.


North American T-28 Trojan, Soc Trang, circa 1963

North American T-28 Trojan, Soc Trang, circa 1963


"After taking off, the most comforting thing we heard came from the Australians who had the radar site on top of the mountain out in Cam Ranh Bay. As they handed you off, the last thing they always said was, ‘Good luck and good hunting.’"
— Harlan S. Pinkerton Jr., USAF F-4 Phantom pilot with the 557th Tactical Air Squadron.

1st Infantry Division soldier

1st Infantry Division soldier


ROK Army 105mm howitzer

ROK Army 105mm howitzer


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 88 notes
US Marines

US Marines


Book Giveaway by vietnamwarera

vietnamwarera:

To celebrate 7000+ followers, I am going to be giving away a hardcover copy of Vietnam: A History by Stanley Karnow, first published in 1983. This is an essential volume to anyone looking to learn about the Vietnam War, and the long history behind it, in depth. 

From the book jacket:

The time is ripe for a comprehensive, fair-minded history of America’s war in Vietnam. Stanley Karnow’s magnificent book is precisely that - an enthralling narrative that clarifies, analyzes, and demystifies this tragic ordeal. Panoramic in scope, profound in understanding, and compassionate in its human portrayals, it is filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with hundreds of participants on both sides. In its wealth of detail and its sure grasp of the issues, Vietnam: A History transcends the past and contains lessons relevant to the present and future.

Notes:
The copy being given away is a used book, but in good condition. There are a few very small tears in the book jacket and there is discoloration of the book jacket on the spine. There is no writing or other marks anywhere on or in the book.

You must be willing to give me your full name and mailing address if you win. This information will not be shared with anyone else.

I will be covering the full cost of shipping. Because of this, I can only afford to ship within the United states.

I will be using Random Line Picker to determine the winner.

*The winner will be chosen the day after the giveaway ends and will have three days to contact me via ask box to claim the book or another winner will be chosen.*

Rules:

  • To enter, simply reblog this post.
  • You may only reblog twice.
  • Likes do not count.
  • Open to residents of the United States only.

*****Giveaway ends August 23, 2014 at 11:59pm EST.*****


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 29 notes
If you could fight in any war . What war would it be and why ?
Anonymous

Take it how you will, but I rather not fight in a war. War has been romanticized and glorified far too much. It is not something we should wish to be a part of.

That being said, were I able to serve my country in the armed forces, I would do so. But not out of desire to experience war.


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Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 32 notes

A Vietnamese soldier gets wounded. His eyes say he’s in pain and has little time for my camera and guys like me. The Seal Team patch on his arm says he does different work. Sailors who “get over” taking pictures all day are not his cup of tea. “To hell with you,” he accuses with his stare. But the guy in the back has something strange to say. He laughs and gestures to the village I had just briefly visited. He thinks he knows what I was looking for. I fly with the wounded to the hospital ship. I take pictures all day.

— Bill Gann, US Navy photographer

A Vietnamese soldier gets wounded. His eyes say he’s in pain and has little time for my camera and guys like me. The Seal Team patch on his arm says he does different work. Sailors who “get over” taking pictures all day are not his cup of tea. “To hell with you,” he accuses with his stare. But the guy in the back has something strange to say. He laughs and gestures to the village I had just briefly visited. He thinks he knows what I was looking for. I fly with the wounded to the hospital ship. I take pictures all day.

Bill Gann, US Navy photographer


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 72 notes
US Navy “zippo boat” - a boat modified to carry flamethrowers

US Navy “zippo boat” - a boat modified to carry flamethrowers


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 49 notes

Chaplain Charles Watters with the 173rd Airborne Brigade was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for actions taken on 19 Nov 1967 during the Battle of Dak To. Below is the citation for his award.

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Chaplain Watters distinguished himself during an assault in the vicinity of Dak To. Chaplain Watters was moving with one of the companies when it engaged a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged and the casualties mounted, Chaplain Watters, with complete disregard for his safety, rushed forward to the line of contact. Unarmed and completely exposed, he moved among, as well as in front of the advancing troops, giving aid to the wounded, assisting in their evacuation, giving words of encouragement, and administering the last rites to the dying. When a wounded paratrooper was standing in shock in front of the assaulting forces, Chaplain Watters ran forward, picked the man up on his shoulders and carried him to safety. As the troopers battled to the first enemy entrenchment, Chaplain Watters ran through the intense enemy fire to the front of the entrenchment to aid a fallen comrade. A short time later, the paratroopers pulled back in preparation for a second assault. Chaplain Watters exposed himself to both friendly and enemy fire between the 2 forces in order to recover 2 wounded soldiers. Later, when the battalion was forced to pull back into a perimeter, Chaplain Watters noticed that several wounded soldiers were lying outside the newly formed perimeter. Without hesitation and ignoring attempts to restrain him, Chaplain Watters left the perimeter three times in the face of small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire to carry and to assist the injured troopers to safety. Satisfied that all of the wounded were inside the perimeter, he began aiding the medics … applying field bandages to open wounds, obtaining and serving food and water, giving spiritual and mental strength and comfort. During his ministering, he moved out to the perimeter from position to position redistributing food and water, and tending to the needs of his men. Chaplain Watters was giving aid to the wounded when he himself was mortally wounded. Chaplain Watters’ unyielding perseverance and selfless devotion to his comrades was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 48 notes
Helicopters aboard an aircraft carrier.

Helicopters aboard an aircraft carrier.


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 48 notes
Red Cross “Donut Dollies” with the 101st Airborne Division, Phu Bai.

Red Cross “Donut Dollies” with the 101st Airborne Division, Phu Bai.