US Navy SEAL team insertion

US Navy SEAL team insertion


"The Mud, The Blood, and The Beer": Quad .50 on the back of a two and half ton truck.

"The Mud, The Blood, and The Beer": Quad .50 on the back of a two and half ton truck.


Combat engineer providing security atop a vehicle beside a .50 caliber machine gun. There’s an M14 in his lap.

Combat engineer providing security atop a vehicle beside a .50 caliber machine gun. There’s an M14 in his lap.


Boeing CH-47 Chinook delivers supplies to a semi-permanent LZ.

Boeing CH-47 Chinook delivers supplies to a semi-permanent LZ.


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 20 notes
Coursey Chapel, 1965

Coursey Chapel, 1965


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 73 notes
25th Infantry Division soldier south of Cu Chi after a night operation that ended with the search of a village at dawn, revealing hidden weapons, 1967.

25th Infantry Division soldier south of Cu Chi after a night operation that ended with the search of a village at dawn, revealing hidden weapons, 1967.


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 34 notes
Book Giveaway by vietnamwarera

To celebrate 7000+ followers, I am going to be giving away a hardcover copy of Vietnam: A History by Stanley Karnow, first published in 1983. This is an essential volume to anyone looking to learn about the Vietnam War, and the long history behind it, in depth. 

From the book jacket:

The time is ripe for a comprehensive, fair-minded history of America’s war in Vietnam. Stanley Karnow’s magnificent book is precisely that - an enthralling narrative that clarifies, analyzes, and demystifies this tragic ordeal. Panoramic in scope, profound in understanding, and compassionate in its human portrayals, it is filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with hundreds of participants on both sides. In its wealth of detail and its sure grasp of the issues, Vietnam: A History transcends the past and contains lessons relevant to the present and future.

Notes:
The copy being given away is a used book, but in good condition. There are a few very small tears in the book jacket and there is discoloration of the book jacket on the spine. There is no writing or other marks anywhere on or in the book.

You must be willing to give me your full name and mailing address if you win. This information will not be shared with anyone else.

I will be covering the full cost of shipping. Because of this, I can only afford to ship within the United states.

I will be using Random Line Picker to determine the winner.

*The winner will be chosen the day after the giveaway ends and will have three days to contact me via ask box to claim the book or another winner will be chosen.*

Rules:

*****Giveaway ends August 23, 2014 at 11:59pm EST.*****


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 71 notes

Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 99 notes
101st Airborne soldier in the field, 1970.

101st Airborne soldier in the field, 1970.


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 6 notes

grizzlypgirl replied to your post “What do you mean “dispel myths of baby killers etc”? I’m sure the vast majority of US personnel were (so far as war allows) good people. But it is no myth that a small number were anything but.”

Define baby killer. Many had to make terrible split second decisions about what to do. And I would be hard pressed to question a decision made in the field.

The origin of the term  ”baby killer” is thought to be a result of the My Lai massacre, during which hundreds of unarmed Vietnamese civilians were killed by a US Army infantry company on March 16, 1968. Men, women, and children were among the victims. With the war already vastly disapproved of, the exposure of this incident threw gas on the fire. Veterans of the war were called “baby killers” by protesters who believed that incidents such as the My Lai massacre were very common occurrences in Vietnam.

I am using this definition, in which “baby killer” refers to the ruthless killing of unarmed civilians, including children, for no military purpose whatsoever.

I am not referring in anyway to split second decisions made during combat.


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 27 notes

"Photo circa June 1967 of Lt. James Michener, USA who served as Major General Byong H. Lew’s pilot, taking him in and out of the places where his Tiger Division forces were located.”
Major General Lew (also known as Yoo Byung-hyun, or Byong H. Lew) was a the leader of the ROK Tiger Division, a position he took from Lt. General Chae Myung Shin He would later become the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for the ROK military. Following his retirement, he served as the ROK ambassador to the US from 1980-1985.
(I couldn’t find a decent-quality photo of Lew. Source is here.)

"Photo circa June 1967 of Lt. James Michener, USA who served as Major General Byong H. Lew’s pilot, taking him in and out of the places where his Tiger Division forces were located.”

Major General Lew (also known as Yoo Byung-hyun, or Byong H. Lew) was a the leader of the ROK Tiger Division, a position he took from Lt. General Chae Myung Shin He would later become the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for the ROK military. Following his retirement, he served as the ROK ambassador to the US from 1980-1985.

(I couldn’t find a decent-quality photo of Lew. Source is here.)


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 10 notes

I have this Vietnam era jacket and am having difficulty identifying the insignia on the left arm (shown on the right in this photo). I looked through all the insignia in “Vietnam: Order of Battle” (which is an amazing resource btw) and didn’t find it. Can anyone help me out? Thank you!

Submitted by a follower.
Can anyone identify the patch on the right side of the photo?

I have this Vietnam era jacket and am having difficulty identifying the insignia on the left arm (shown on the right in this photo). I looked through all the insignia in “Vietnam: Order of Battle” (which is an amazing resource btw) and didn’t find it. Can anyone help me out? Thank you!

Submitted by a follower.

Can anyone identify the patch on the right side of the photo?


Soldiers of the 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division in the field.

Soldiers of the 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division in the field.


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 4 notes
What do you mean "dispel myths of baby killers etc"? I'm sure the vast majority of US personnel were (so far as war allows) good people. But it is no myth that a small number were anything but.
Anonymous

I meant the myths that EVERY service member took part in such actions. I am well aware that there were those in took part in less than honorable events. I am not trying to say that they did not occur at all.

Apologies if my wording confused this.


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 25 notes
Hi,can I ask what inspire you to create such a wonderful blog for us .

From the About page:

My own interest in the Vietnam War began in June 2005 when I visited Washington, DC with my family. I was 15 at the time. At the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (or “The Wall”), my father stopped walking and cried. I had never seen my father cry and immediately wondered what could bring a man who hid any softer emotions to the point of tears. I began reading anything I could get my hands on, mainly memoirs, in my attempt to understand what exactly it was about Vietnam that could bring out such emotion in my father. I figured it out long ago, but I can’t shake my interest.

Learning about the war and how misunderstood it still is today is what really drives me today. I want people to understand the causes, and the repercussions of decisions made. I also want to dispel any lingering myths that the soldiers who served in Vietnam were “baby killers”, etc. While I tend to focus on the American aspect, I wish the truth to be known about all sides and involved parties.

My goal here is education.